Archives for posts with tag: cycling

I’ve had this blog in my mind and even outlined for some time. The original plan was to post this in January but here we are in March. Better late than never right?

Ironically I wrote this on the first full day of spring in a snowstorm. Yet unlike January consistent good cycling days are right around the corner.

It is always a good thing to look back at the previous season or year of any activity and think about what worked and what didn’t work for you. Cycling is no different. A new year should mean more adventures and more fun.

So over the next few blogs we are going to dive into just that. The goal should be to make this year even more fun than last year. Plus if you have things to look forward to it makes it even easier to stay motivated for those things. I don’t know about you but I always am happier and stay a little more focused when I know my next activity, event or vacation.

Creating a plan makes everything easier. You know what you have to look forward to. You think about it once and then you know you are going to get to do what you want to do.

It is always a good idea to ask yourself some questions to help make your next year of riding even better.

So the first question is:

What worked and what didn’t?

Obviously you want to keep doing more of what worked and address the areas that didn’t.

If it is a ride that is easy – just don’t do it again. Simple I know.

Before the climb. Tucson trip November 2017 Mt Lemmon

Memories from great rides last a lifetime!

What were your favorite rides? Do you want to do them again?

Most organized rides happen on the same weekend each year. Look them up mark your calendar and register early to save some money. Then invite some friends come along and ride with you. Riding with friends and family members is always more fun.

What came easy?

It is likely you’ll want to continue doing more of this. Make sure you keep it in the plan for your year. The easy stuff elevates the fun factor for your cycling.

Did you ride enough? – Mileage Goals – Do you track your rides?

Planning your riding season early and getting the rides on the calendar is the first step to making sure you get the rides in you want and don’t miss anything.

If you have a mileage goal which I know many people do. Do you have enough time to meet that goal with the riding you do?

Sometimes it is hard to find the extra time but if you include riding in stuff you already do you can often find extra time.

When you hang out with friends what do you do?

Could you do that on a ride on the local bike trail? You can still talk and maybe you stop for lunch or food along the way. Could you commute a few days a week to work? You’ll arrive at work more energized for sure. Maybe you couldn’t ride both ways. My Uncle used to rideshare with a friend. They would drive in together and then one of them would ride their bike home, taking turns driving. That way they arrived for work clean and ready to work and had the ride home to look forward to. They would leave their cloths in the office and then bring everything home on Friday. Many offices have locker rooms making riding round trip even easier.

Finding local group rides, typically weekly, is a great way to meet new people to ride with and to increase your riding mileage.

Read the rest of this entry »

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Famous People and Bicycles

Certainly on the short list of famous people who had ties to cycling and the cycling industry are the Wright brothers. They bought their first bicycles in 1892 and in 1893 they started a repair and rental business in Dayton, Ohio. Expansion was next for the brothers as they started manufacturing their own line of bicycles. It is here where they started creating and building their flying machines. Ultimately using this knowledge and experience in their design and construction of the airplane.

 

 

 

From the Air and Space Website:

“In designing their airplane, the Wrights drew upon a number of bicycle concepts:

The Wright Brothers Bicycle Store Dayton, Ohio

•             The central importance of balance and control.

•             The need for strong but lightweight structures.

•             The chain-and-sprocket transmission system for propulsion.

•             Concerns regarding wind resistance and aerodynamic shape of the operator.”

From: https://airandspace.si.edu/exhibitions/wright-brothers/online/who/1895/biketoflight.cfm

The Wright Brothers journey is truly fascinating and the bicycle played a major role in their lives. Obviously there is a ton of material about them so I won’t go on but I do highly recommend David McCullough book “The Wright Brothers” if you want to dig deeper into their story. Also the Air and Space Museum has some great information that can be found from the link above.

The bike hasn’t changed much in its basic shape over the years. It certainly gotten better and a lot more choices in styles etc.

Bicycle History

A little history of the bicycle again from Wikipedia:

The first verifiable claim for a practically used bicycle belongs to German Baron Karl von Drais, a civil servant to the Grand Duke of Baden in Germany. Drais invented his Laufmaschine (German for “running machine”) of 1817 that was called Draisine (English) or draisienne (French) by the press. Karl von Drais patented this design in 1818, which was the first commercially successful two-wheeled, steerable, human-propelled machine, commonly called a velocipede, and nicknamed hobby-horse or dandy horse.[8] It was initially manufactured in Germany and France. Hans-Erhard Lessing (Drais’ biographer) found from circumstantial evidence that Drais’ interest in finding an alternative to the horse was the starvation and death of horses caused by crop failure in 1816, the Year Without a Summer following the volcanic eruption of Tambora in 1815).[9] On his first reported ride from Mannheim on June 12, 1817, he covered 13 km (eight miles) in less than an hour.[10] Constructed almost entirely of wood, the draisine weighed 22 kg (48 pounds), had brass bushings within the wheel bearings, iron shod wheels, a rear-wheel brake and 152 mm (6 inches) of trail of the front-wheel for a self-centering caster effect. This design was welcomed by mechanically minded men daring to balance, and several thousand copies were built and used, primarily in Western Europe and in North America. Its popularity rapidly faded when, partly due to increasing numbers of accidents, some city authorities began to prohibit its use.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_bicycle

Image Information: https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=4406665

So now that we have a little of the background stuff out of the way we’ll be sharing quotes and talking about some famous people who ride bicycles.