Part 2 of our Kids Bicycle Buyer’s Guide

(If you missed Part One check it out from yesterday.)

Weight: A few pounds give or take may not seem like a lot of weight difference in an adult bicycle but it can be a world of difference for your child’s bicycle. A three pound difference on a bicycle with a 30 lbs. rider is 10% of the rider’s body weight. Where with an adult 150 lbs. rider that would be a 15lbs difference. Adults wouldn’t enjoy riding a bike that was an extra 15 lbs. heavier proportionally why would our children?

Extra weight can come from not only the frame but the materials used in the components. Steel vs. aluminum. Example: A three piece crank using alloy crank arms will not only be lighter than a one piece crank set but it uses a higher quality bottom bracket that will make pedaling easier and smoother for the rider.

Sizing

When talking about sizes in children’s bicycles we talk about wheel size. This is different from adult bicycles were we talk about the frame size.

Kids bicycles come in 12 inch wheels, 14 inch wheels (generally not a bike shop size) 16 inch wheels, 18 inch wheels (generally not a bike shop size accept in a BMX style) 20 inch wheel and 24 inch wheel.

2017_Trek_Kids_Dialed_Girls_HR-resizePosition: A more upright position is certainly the preferred position for the 12 inch and 16 inch size. When you get to the 20 inch it tends to be a crossover size as far as position. Some manufacturers stay with a more upright position where others tend to go towards a more adult like position. The belief is that the adult like position is a little easier to ride. Offering more comfortable riding longer distances and easier when transitioning to a larger size. Neither is right or wrong but something to consider. A less confident rider will likely benefit from being a little more upright.

Frame: Not all frames are created equally. How do the welds look on the frame? Especially at the drop outs. Are the drop  outs stamped or welded to the frame?  Does the manufacture stand behind its product with a warranty? Most major manufacturers offer a lifetime warranty on their frames. If you were to need the warranty how is that handled? Do you work direct with the manufacture or does the retailer take care of it on your behalf?

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